Depression Myths and Facts: Take the Quiz

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD on February 13, 2012, Sources, This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information, © 2012 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

http://www.webmd.com/depression/rm-quiz-depression?ecd=wnl_dep_082313&ctr=wnl-dep-082313_ld-stry&mb=

Foods That Fight Depression

The research is in. What you put in your mouth can provide a nice boost to your mood, or make you not to fun to be around. Researchers think brain foods such as those containing omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, and important amino acids like tryptophan cause changes to some fats in brain membranes, helping certain chemicals to pass through. That’s what happened in the laboratory rats in a study at McLean Hospital, explains Chris Illiades, M.D., in a recent Everyday Health article.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/foods-that-fight-depression/?pos=1&xid=nl_EverydayHealthEmotionalHealth_20130824

 

10 Cognitive Distortions

Both David Burns (bestselling author of “Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy“ and Abraham Low (founder of Recovery, Inc.) teach techniques to analyze negative thoughts (or identify distorted thinking — what psychologists call “cognitive distortions”) so to be able to disarm and defeat them. This is one of the major precepts of cognitive behavioral therapy.

Since Low’s language is a bit out-dated, I list below Burns’ “Ten Forms of Twisted Thinking,” (adapted from his “Feeling Good” book, a classic read) categories of dangerous ruminations, that when identified and brought into your consciousness, lose their power over you. They have been helpful in my recovery from depression and anxiety. After I identify them, I consult his 15 Ways to Untwist Your Thinking.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/10-cognitive-distortions/?pos=1&xid=nl_EverydayHealthEmotionalHealth_20130903

What Are The Symptoms Of Depression?

Most of us have moments or short periods of sadness when we feel lonely or depressed. These sensations are usually normal ones that sometimes occur in life. They can be the result of a recent loss, having a particularly challenging day or week, or a reaction to a hurtful comment. However, when feelings of sadness and being unable to cope overwhelm the person, so much so that they undermine their ability to live a normal and active life, it is possible that they have what is known as a major depressive disorder (MDD), also calledclinical depressionunipolar depression or major depression. Informally, the condition is simply referred to as depression.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241862.php